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Abpi Joint Working Agreement Template

05 Mar Posted by in Uncategorized | Comments
Abpi Joint Working Agreement Template

The documentation must clearly indicate that this is a joint work project and must take into account relevant best practice guidelines for joint work between the NHS, the pharmaceutical industry and other relevant business organisations. AbPI has developed guidelines for joint collaboration between pharmaceutical companies and the NHS and others for the benefit of patients. The ABPI guidelines refer to the requirements of the Code, but go far beyond that. The written agreement must cover the following: The Department of Health defines joint cooperation between the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry as situations in which one or more pharmaceutical companies and the NHS pool their skills, experience and/or resources for the joint development and implementation of patient-centred projects for the benefit of patients and work together to ensure successful delivery. A joint working agreement may be based on the use of a particular medicinal product of an undertaking party to the agreement, but only if the following conditions are met and the parties are satisfied that the use of the medicinal product improves patient care. The goods and services provided by the undertaking under the joint working agreement must be relevant to the medicinal products concerned and the agreement as a whole must be fair and proportionate. All goods and services provided by the company must themselves contribute to patient care. Each party must make a significant contribution and the results must be measured. Treatments must comply with nationally recognised clinical guidelines, where applicable. Joint cooperation between the pharmaceutical industry and the NHS must be open and transparent. Joint work must be done in the interests of patients, but it is expected that the agreements will also benefit the NHS and the pharmaceutical company(s) involved. Working together is different from the situation where pharmaceutical companies only provide funds for a particular event or program.

The resources provided by the Corporation for the implementation of the collaborative work project must be relevant and the agreement as a whole must be fair and reasonable. All resources provided by the company must themselves contribute to patient care or healthcare. Any collaborative work must comply with all relevant guidelines, including NHS guidelines. Collaborative work is generally acceptable, provided it is done in a manner consistent with the Code. Collaborative work does not encourage health professionals or other relevant decision-makers to prescribe, provide, recommend, buy or sell drugs. It is therefore always necessary to ensure that none of the benefits of a collaborative work project go to these individuals or their practices. If collaborative work is a collaborative work project and there are benefits that come from the NHS, they have to go to an NHS or similar organisation. The Department of Health has published best practice guidelines for joint collaboration between the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry and other relevant commercial organisations. The Ministry of Health and ABPI have jointly published Moving beyond sponsorship: interactive toolkit for joint work between the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry. Collaborative work that relies on the benefits of the NHS and the maintenance of patient care will not meet the requirements of a joint work project. Materials related to collaborative work must be certified, including the summary of the collaborative work arrangement. The collaborative work agreement does not need to be certified.

Only the final documents, etc. for each collaborative work project need to be certified. All documents, etc. used during project development must meet the same standard as certified equipment, but there is no obligation to certify this material. The material used in the implementation of the collaborative work project must also comply with the requirements of section 8.3, e.B. educational material for the public or patients regarding the diseases or drugs used during the performance of the collaborative work must be certified. Medical and educational goods and services (MEGS) provided in accordance with Article 19 of the 2019 Code may fall within the scope of donations referred to in Article 23 or collaborative work of Article 20 of the 2021 Code. Companies wishing to continue the ongoing MEGS from July 1, 2021 can do so until December 31, 2021 under the 2021 Code, without having to be reclassified as a gift or collaborative work and meet new requirements as a result of this change. So there is a six-month transition period for the MEGS. In addition to the certification requirements set out in section 20.3, the joint work project initiation document must also be certified. The Department of Health has published best practice guidelines for joint cooperation between the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry and other relevant trade organisations.

AbPI has developed guidelines for joint collaboration between pharmaceutical companies and the NHS and others for the benefit of patients, with separate guidelines for England, Scotland and Wales. When considering joint work, companies should take into account the applicable guidelines. Collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare organizations, and others may also include collaboration with a patient organization. In such circumstances, the terms of involvement of the patient organisation must comply with clause 27 and are likely to be a contractual service as defined in clause 27.5. While the ABPI guidelines are primarily aimed at joint collaboration between pharmaceutical companies and the NHS, they also cover joint work done through third-party providers and/or with private healthcare providers. The use of a particular medicinal product of a company belonging to a cooperation working agreement is not prohibited provided that all parties are satisfied that the use of the medicinal product is appropriate and that the requirements of collaborative work are met. Collaborative work that improves patient care or benefits patients, or that benefits the NHS and at least maintains patient care, is acceptable provided it is carried out in a code-compliant manner. Collaborative work usually takes place between one or more pharmaceutical companies, healthcare organizations, and other organizations.

Collaborative work is a limited form of collaborative work as set out in section 20.4. Businesses must ensure that the amount spent on joint work projects is published, that the value is transferred to a health care organization, or that another funding model is used. Collaborative work, including its implementation, must demonstrate and demonstrate the pooling of skills, experience and/or resources of all parties involved in the joint development and implementation of patient- and/or health-oriented projects. There must be a common commitment of all parties to a successful performance, and each party must make a meaningful contribution. 2 www.abpi.org.uk/ethics/ethical-responsibility/disclosure-uk/ When considering joint cooperation, companies should take into account the guidelines of the ABPI and the Ministry of Health. In principle, joint work is permitted, provided that it is carried out in accordance with the Code. In particular, it does not encourage health professionals or other relevant decision-makers to prescribe, dispense, recommend, buy or sell medicines. It is therefore always necessary to ensure that all the benefits of joint work that the NHS has the right to go not to individuals or practices, but to an NHS or other organisation. .

 

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